The DRAGON and HORSE Colouring Books are here!!!

Oh man!!! The books are SOOOO beautiful and so affordable – only $6.50 each! We are so excited! YAAAAAYYYY!!! They are available for sale on Etsy and on Amazon both (links are below). And we’ll be doing some local fairs this fall – we’ll be sure to announce when and where. HorseCover_CompleteFrom the brute strength of the Draft horse to the speed and agility of the Arabian, horses have plowed fields, pulled carriages and ridden faithfully into battle for humans throughout the centuries. This collection of beautifully crafted drawings invites young and old alike to re-create the beauty and majesty of the faithful horse – and it’s mystical cousins, the unicorn and Pegasus – in vivid colour. Designed to delight and inspire, artists Micheline Ryckman and Hayden Wolf also include a step-by-step guide to budding artists and horse enthusiasts everywhere to create and colour their own loyal horse companions. Our horse colouring book is NOW available for sale on ETSY! Here are a few more peeks inside this book >>>Horse_04 )neHorse_LogoCenterPageSpread2BuyNowEtys SneakPeek2From Saint George and the Dragon to Puff the Magic Dragon and Cressida Cowell’s modern-day book series, How to Train a Dragon, the lore of dragons passes from one generation to the next. Fearsome, magical and majestic they still have the power to thrill us, scare us and entertain us. This collection of beautifully crafted drawings invites young and old alike to re-create the beauty and ferocity of dragons in vivid colour. Designed to delight and inspire, artists Micheline Ryckman and Hayden Wolf also include a step-by-step guide to budding artists and dragon enthusiasts everywhere to create and colour their own magical creatures. Our dragon colouring book is NOW available for sale on ETSY! Here are a few more peeks inside this book >>>Dragon_19 Dragon_18 )ne CenterPageSpread1BuyNowEtys

Have Horse, Can Colour

From the brute strength of the Draft horse to the speed and agility of the Arabian, horses have plowed fields, pulled carriages and ridden faithfully into battle for humans throughout the centuries.

In addition to contributing to human success, horses have an intriguing role in mythology, represented as unicorn, Pegasus and centaur. That’s why Micheline and I have chosen the horse (and it’s mystical cousins) as a follow-up to our mystical dragons colouring book.

Designed to delight and inspire, this book is also illustrated by Micheline Ryckman and newcomer Hayden Wolf and will include a step-by-step drawing guide along with a collection of stunning, ready-to-colour drawings.

Enjoy the “sneak peek “ inside our new colouring book and be sure to check back for details of how you can win a copy of it, due out this fall.

Cheers 🙂

TrinaHorse1 Horse2

Designing Dragons

From Saint George and the Dragon to Puff the Magic Dragon and Cressida Cowell’s modern-day book series, How to Train a Dragon, the lore of dragons passes from one generation to the next. Fearsome, magical and majestic they still have the power to thrill us, scare us and entertain us.

At Whimsical Publishing, Micheline and I are really excited to breath new life into the iconic dragon with our new colouring book, Whimsical’s World of Dragons.

Designed to delight and inspire, artists Micheline Ryckman and newcomer, Hayden Wolf, will also include a step-by-step guide to budding artists and dragon enthusiasts everywhere to create and colour their own magical creatures.

We’ve included a sneak peek inside the book below. Details of how you can win a copy of our new colouring book – due out this fall – will follow soon. Hayden Wolf - Dragon Small Dragon4

While you’re waiting for our new release check out our FREE colouring pages!

Happy colouring,

Trina 🙂

The Art of the Humble Horse

I’ve known Micheline’s daughter, Hannah since she was about four years old. In the decade I’ve known her I’ve watched her grow and into a lovely young woman. While it’s normal to outgrow the things you loved as a child there’s one love Hannah has never outgrown; her love of horses.HannahRiding Hannah 13 years_02If you’ve been following our blogs you already know this. You’ve probably seen pictures of Hannah’s horse, Lady and pony, Babe. Maybe you’ve even read some of Hannah’s stories or seen some of her beautiful drawings.

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Hannah isn’t alone in this passion; there’s something special about horses that continues to draw us to them from a very young age. We devote shelf space to Classic books like Anna Sewell’s Black Beauty and watch timeless movies like National Velvet. Famous artwork owes its inspiration to this gentle beast from the stunning The Large Blue Horses painting by German artist, Franz Marc to the bronze sculptures by Frederic Remington.Booksthe-large-blue-horsesWhimsical Publishing has also been inspired by the simple horse. In fact,  WE’RE PUBLISHING A HORSE COLOURING BOOK! With original artwork by house-artist Micheline Ryckman and newcomer Hayden Wolf, this book will also include a step-by-step guide for budding artists and horse enthusiasts everywhere to draw and colour their own stunning horses.

Stay tuned for a sneak peek inside the book and details of how you can win a copy of our new colouring book due out this fall! In the meantime, check out this cool website from Horse Channel on their 30 favourite children’s horse stories: Horse Channel. 🙂

~ Trina

Oh, Bother!

I do love classic Winnie the Pooh quotes (I’ve attached a few for you here) but I have to admit that I’m not the only one. My entire family and I tend to curse in ‘Pooh’.

“Oh, bother!”, “Stuff and fluff!” and “Silly old Bear” are common phrases used in our house as a response to just about everything –stubbing one’s toe, messing up, or having a bad hair day.

But I say “Tiddely Pom” and “Ha!” to anyone who doesn’t understand the power of Pooh in life’s critical moments! Perhaps there’s a better way of expressing oneself but –as Pooh has said himself, “perhaps there isn’t”.

And really, I think Pooh would approve of my family’s unorthodox expletives. After all, it was Pooh who pointed out that “It is more fun to talk with someone who doesn’t use long, difficult words but rather short, easy words like “What about lunch?” (or oh bother, stuff and fluff, tiddely pom and ha!).

 It could be worse; we could be cursing in ‘Spongebob’;

“Oh, Barnacle”

“Holy Shrimp!”

“Tartar Sauce!”

However, despite the fact that these expletives don’t have the wisdom of a Pooh, they are short, easy words. And a couple of them could describe lunch… 😉

~ Micheline

Of Mice and Children

When I was six I lived a couple of blocks from St. Mary’s church. Both grand and inviting this beautiful circular structure was created by aboriginal architect Douglas Cardinal. My sister, friends and I loved to play hide and seek among the confessionals and pews. But we especially liked the mice that lived in the fields around the church.

One crisp October evening we got it into our heads that it was too cold for the mice to sleep safely outside. So we gathered up a dozen of them with the idea of providing warmer beds within the church.

I don’t know where we got the idea that mice couldn’t survive outside, but I have a feeling it had a lot to do with the stories we read as kids. From “The Night Before Christmas” to “The Country Mouse and the City Mouse” these critters seemed to be a lot like us humans. Thankfully, the kind priest helped us understand why mice must live outside.

Even though I no longer view mice through the humanizing eyes of a child I still love the children’s stories that do. I guess that’s why –even though Miss Emily Goes to Bat is the story about a cat –you’ll find mice on every page.

You can have a look at this amazing church at http://stmarysparish.shawwebspace.ca/photos/view/our_church/. The field is gone and the rose garden is new, but the building remains a work of art.

~Trina

The Secret to Suess

Last Christmas I donated all of my Dr. Seuss books to “A Book Under Every Tree.” It’s a wonderful literacy initiative that benefits kids who may not have a lot of books in their home. I was happy to donate the books but the fact is I kinda miss them as well.

You see Dr. Seuss is one of my favourite authors and even though Will and Thom think they’ve outgrown his stories, I know I haven’t. Perhaps it’s his use of nonsensical words or the enjoyable way they roll off my tongue. Perhaps it’s the unstated yet resonant message of his stories. Or perhaps it’s my appreciation for the man himself.

Dr. Seuss (born Theodor Seuss Geisel) had moxie. Despite the fact that he came from a family of German brewmasters during the onset of prohibition and World War I, Seuss (aka Ted) was able to gain popularity with his peers simply by being himself.

Seuss had perseverance –his first children’s book, And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, was rejected 27 times before going to publication.

He had talent and versatility. Before he was a best-selling author he was a cartoonist for such notable publications as The Saturday Evening Post, Life and Vanity Fair. He was an ad man, a patriot and an academy award winning animator of World War II military training films.

And he changed the way educators approach children’s literacy.

Not everyone is aware of this, but Dr. Seuss’ Cat in the Hat –considered to be the first “playground word-of-mouth bestseller” –was actually written in response to a challenge from William Spaulding, then-director of the education division at Houghton Miffin.

Spaulding had read a 1954 Life magazine article by John Hersey that suggested the reason schoolchildren couldn’t read was because books, like Dick and Jane, “were too boring”. (True that!) Spaulding then challenged Seuss to not only write a story that 1st graders wouldn’t be able to put down, but to write it using no more than 250 of the 348 words that Spaulding felt were important for grade one children to know. Seuss used 236.

I guess that’s the secret to Seuss and why he’s a favourite of mine –moxie, perseverance, talent and legacy. Yes, I admit I still miss my Dr. Seuss books but when I consider the benefits they’re providing to their newest owners I think I can live without them. 🙂

~ Trina